The Bridge of Remembrance in Hobart, Tasmania; The Bridge of Remembrance in Hobart, Tasmania;

Bridge of Remembrance, Hobart

Making a meaningful connection

A visually stunning pedestrian and bicycle bridge now links two of Hobart’s most significant places of remembrance – the Cenotaph and Soldiers Memorial Avenue on the Queens Domain, with its trees and plaques honouring World War I soldiers.

The commemorative precinct has been unified by the 200m long Bridge of Remembrance, which provides visitors a spectacular crossing above the busy Tasman Highway.

The new bridge also provides a connection between other key features of the city, including the Doone Kennedy Hobart Aquatic Centre, the intercity cycleway, the Regatta Grounds and Sullivans Cove.

Commissioned by the City of Hobart, the Bridge, using Australian steel and local fabricators and contractors, is very much a local project which is improving intercity access. The City of Hobart’s funding partner was the Federal Government’s ANZAC Centenary Fund, which was established to commemorate 100 years of service and sacrifice by Australian service men and women in all wars, conflict and peacekeeping operations since World War I.

Project Summary


4metres wide

600mmstructural depth

200metreslong

The Bridge of Remembrance was designed to be worthy of a memorial precinct and entry way to the city. Denton Corker Marshall (DCM) was the architect, working closely with Arup’s multidisciplinary engineering team which provided structural, civil, lighting, electrical and façade design services.

The unique and elegant outcome is a product of the genuine integration of architecture and engineering, and reflects 20+ years of collaboration on significant projects between Denton Corker Marshall and Arup. ” Neil Bourne Project Director, Denton Corker Marshall

The bridge’s design is an elegant, twisting plane, growing from the ground and leaping over the main road entering Hobart. It comprises a hybrid three span continuous structural form based on a structural steel box girder deck combined with a hidden steel box structure for the wings that rotates 180° across the length of the bridge, varying the structural depth to match the bridge forces. The anodised aluminium cladding panels are secured to the bridge structure with a secondary non-structural frame and jointed to permit the structure to safely deflect.

The substructure comprises reinforced concrete piers founded on buried spread foundations. The end span is cable anchored against uplift with its foundation secured with four 9m deep stressed rock anchors.


We hope that as people walk across the bridge they will think of the sacrifice and courage of all Australians who served and lost their lives in all wars, conflicts and peacekeeping operations since World War I. ” Anna Reynolds Hobart Lord Mayor

The Bridge of Remembrance in Hobart, Tasmania The Bridge of Remembrance in Hobart, Tasmania

The project was not without its challenges. Besides maintaining the required highway clearances and accessibility requirements for bridge users, the site was heavily constrained, with the design team needing to consider the existing memorials, the protection of several large trees and significant underground services crossing the site in close proximity to footings.

To minimise disruption to traffic on the Tasman Highway during construction the bridge was designed to be installed within a single weekend closure.

The scenic location and precinct significance meant many stakeholders were involved, including the City of Hobart, the Tasmanian Department of State Growth, utility companies, veterans’ groups and the Aquatic Centre.


While the site constraints were a challenge on this project, we are proud to have delivered a bridge that provides a safe link to these important places of remembrance while achieving the architectural vision, creating a spectacular gateway to the City of Hobart. ”

Claire Quinlan Arup Claire Quinlan Victoria Highways Business Leader
The Bridge of Remembrance in Hobart, Tasmania The Bridge of Remembrance in Hobart, Tasmania