Rothesay Pavilion. Photo: Simpson & Brown Architects; Rothesay Pavilion. Photo: Simpson & Brown Architects;

Rothesay Pavilion, Isle of Bute

The Rothesay Pavilion was refurbished due to funding from Prince's Trust.

The Rothesay Pavilion is a Category A listed building located on the Isle of Bute. The Pavilion is owned and operated by Argyll and Bute Council, which was granted money by the Prince’s Trust to refurbish and upgrade the facilities and access provisions.

The Pavilion is a multi-purpose hall for the local community, consisting of spacious and flexible accommodation for a wide range of events and performances, including a stage and dance hall, shooting range, dance studios and workshops.

The accessible environments team audited the existing premises to assess the non-compliances against the Scottish Building Regulations and other best practice guidance. The audit included reviewing the Caretaker’s House against Lifetime Home requirements, to maintain visitability and to ensure that the Caretaker and his family are able to remain in the home for as long as possible. This helped to prioritise items for the refurbishment and to formulate the brief for the client, ensuring that the access to the building is maximised as far as the existing constraints allow.



The Pavilion is a multi-purpose hall for the local community, consisting of a stage and dance hall, shooting range, dance studios and workshops. The Pavilion is a multi-purpose hall for the local community, consisting of a stage and dance hall, shooting range, dance studios and workshops.
The Pavilion is a multi-purpose hall for the local community, consisting of a stage and dance hall, shooting range, dance studios and workshops.

Where non-compliances remained, management strategies were put into place to ensure that equivalent and comparable services could be offered. For example, we explored three options with the client for accessing the main hall within the Pavilion; considering the different modes of use, recreational use and use in an event, and the impact of these on the heritage and conservation of the building.

Main image: Simpson and Brown Architects