Palmas Altas Campus

  • The largest commercial and technological development in southern Spain.
  • Developed to embrace Abengoa’s core values of energy efficiency and sustainability while being economically competitive. 
  • The carbon footprint is about 30% lower than typical Spanish offices.

Palmas Altas is the largest commercial and technological development in southern Spain. Located in a new urban development area of Seville, the project is a joint initiative between the City Council and sustainable technology company Abengoa.

While two-thirds of the 100,000m² complex host Abengoa’s headquarters, the third part is occupied by other companies and institutions with similar interests.

Palmas Altas was designed in close collaboration with architects Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners and Luis Vidal + Arquitectos and inaugurated in 2009 by the King of Spain.

Sustainability features

Developed to embrace Abengoa’s core values of energy efficiency and sustainability while being economically competitive, the design will prove itself to be a fully integrated architectural and engineering triumph.

Concept design studies indicating carbon footprint reduction and economic payback have been carried out for all the proposed passive and active sustainability solutions. The passive low energy consumption solutions include orientation, compactness, green roofs, and facades.

The result brings exceptional green credentials to Palmas Altas: the carbon footprint is about 30% lower than typical Spanish offices.

The development has also received the platinum accreditation from the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEEDTM) Green Building rating system, which is the highest accreditation available.

The campus is economically viable as well as sustainable, keeping a tight budget of €850 per m².

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  • Palmas Altas Campus. Credit: Victor Sájara.Open gallery

    The project is the largest commercial and technological development in southern Spain.

  • Palmas Altas Campus. Credit: Victor Sájara.Open gallery

    The carbon footprint is about 30% lower than typical Spanish offices.